border_less
Ekran Resmi 2018-08-29 12.12.46.png

A History of Pictures: David Hockney and Martin Gayford in Conversation

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

 
 

A History of Pictures: David Hockney and Martin Gayford in Conversation


Zeynep Beler

4-5 min. read / scroll down for text in Turkish

 

A new book by David Hockney and Martin Gayford, A History of Pictures: From the Cave to the Computer Screen, translated by Mine Haydaroğlu, has come out in Turkish by YKY Publishing this past spring. I love David Hockney. Primarily the painter, but oddly enough it was through a series of photographs -photomontages, if you will- that I was introduced to the artist, who has a substantial body of photographic work in addition to his painterly oeuvre. I was studying photography theory at the time and in our photography reader, the work was supposed to demonstrate a shortfall of photography we often rarely notice when pitted against its convincing endorsement of “the truth”-namely that in photographs, we always see reality framed (read: periphery omitted). In the 80’s, Hockney made a series of composite Polaroids, and then made composite images of rooms from 35mm prints, which he called “joiners”. The photos taken of every part of the room, as seen from the single viewpoint of the lens, overlap and create the illusion of the floorboards ending at the viewer’s feet and the ceiling ending above one’s head, as well as having an effect distinctly Cubist, stacking space and time. Thinking about this was heady stuff for a 22-year-old with no prior knowledge of the partiality of representation, and indeed one who had not fully internalized that “any picture is an account of looking at something”.

This is the premise at the heart of A History of Pictures, underscored in its subtitle From the Cave to the Computer Screen: that every kind of picture, from cave paintings to court paintings to photographs to film, are “differing varieties of depictions” that are interlinked. The interview format is collapsed under the eighteen chapters I’m under the impression that the two authors determined in hindsight, breaking up the themes of their conversation. Throughout, David Hockney and Martin Gayford (who also previously collaborated on A Bigger Message: Conversations with David Hockney, a sort of prequel to this book) pitch grappling hooks at current-day uses for photography. There is little counter-argument, but the interview format is especially compelling in a chapter, for instance, devoted to the production of Caravaggio’s paintings, where you can follow them doing some detective work, or when Hockney comments that Van Eyck’s studio “would have been more like MGM”.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

But the plot thickens in Chapter 12, Beauty and Truth in the Age of Reason, as it did in real life when inventors found ways to fix Camera Obscura images onto paper. From here on the two co-authors, along with the visual evidence, demolish the “immaculate-conception theory of photography: that it came from nowhere and was inherently modern. The spirit of photography is much older than photography itself.” They have been gearing up to make this point. The undercurrent of reference to photography throughout the book is a constant, almost pointed, even where it isn’t named as, for instance, when describing Titian’s transforming of “the Emperor Charles V’s grotesquely projecting jaw into an emblem of nobility”. (Charles V is a meme, by the way, as are some of Hockney’s pool paintings, one of which makes a regular appearance on Bojack Horseman, which I think is interesting to note in conjunction to images on the screen). 

Ergo, subjective free association is what makes this book since we’re at no shortage of histories describing the evolution of images. However, though the two co-authors know their history very well, this is far from a history in the rigid sense of the word. Rather, the references jump back and forth in time, presenting history in the sense of laser beams cutting through stacked volumes. Hockney’s own work can often be seen alongside the masterpieces. His presence here is not an egotistical redundancy but rather to demonstrate how a living painter relates to the journey of picture making in his own experience and practice, at what point he has encountered the same conundrums as those of the masters. “A painter would steal anything and color it,” he says, an insight no doubt in the “it takes one to know one” category. For this particular reviewer, a visual artist who works from photographs, it is invaluable to have a glimpse into the inspirational process of a painter who in his work has always been very much interested in investigating the components of images, be it photography or painting. (See, on page 57, the painting Gonzales and Shadow, a painting I am crazy about, and which has many layers, physically and metaphysically: among others, how to appropriate/pay alms to a work by another artist.)

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

Indeed, it’s at the moments such as this that the narrative soars: “What makes a line interesting? It’s movement...lines have a speed in them, which you can see, whether it’s very fast or slow…that’s why economy of means is such a valuable quality in painting. It is a virtue.” Or, “Pictures can be unforgettable, while depicting nothing out of the ordinary. Two people in a room, a view out of the window, a pet: those are the ingredients of Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy, and also of Van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait, painted over four and a half centuries before”. (This rumination on what components make an image unforgettable have surfaced on the previous mention of the Arnolfini Portrait.) Recently, when commenting on my small paintings versus my larger ones, a painter friend noted that the former “have very little anxiety in them”. Such observations, often negligible or incomprehensible to the layman but flowing out of painters’ mouths as naturally as some people breathe, always tend to astonish me, and there are many to be found here.

In passing, I have to note that I probably wouldn’t have read this excellent book if not for the purposes of writing this review, simply because this particular kind of book production grates on my nerves when you are also expected to read it. Coffee-table book couldn’t be a more apt descriptor, since I definitely can’t imagine reading one, say, on my lap in public transportation, but then of course, many people like to sit with books (you could very well argue this is something I also ought to learn to do). Also, Thames & Hudson version is the same and this format is supposed to be impressive and good for viewing a large number of high-resolution photographs. The Turkish version is exactly the same in layout, page for page, in the understanding of its carefully curated interplay of text and images, and ably translated by Mine Haydaroğlu, whose prolificacy as a translator among other things awes me. 

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

‘People get the idea from time to time that everything is finishing. It doesn’t end at all; it just goes on and on and on.’ It would be more accurate to say that rather than kill painting, as it is purported Paul Delaroche, a painter, glumly asserted after seeing Daguerreotypes, photography infused painting with the kiss of life and hand in hand they strode into the future, into our present. So it should come as no surprise that A History of Picturesserves as a reminder, especially at the current juncture where we find everything, from our visual histories to some sub-categories of painting, surrendered to the photographic way of seeing, how the compulsive drive emerged and developed. And remind us it does, by presenting us the ruminations of an artist and a curator, who have looked at pictures very, very closely, together and apart. The nature of their investigations on, as deemed by the former, photography’s parent, are involved and invested, weaving a web of affiliations comprising everything from religious icons and Chinese calligraphy to Hollywood lighting and selfies.

http://www.ykykultur.com.tr/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1t9MEeh2UM


A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.


Resimlerin Tarihi: David Hockney ve Martin Gayford Söyleşisi üzerine


Zeynep Beler

4-5 dakika okuma süresinde

David Hockney ile Martin Gayford tarafından Resmin Tarihi: Mağaradan Bilgisayar Ekranınaadlı kitap geçtiğimiz aylarda Mine Haydaroğlu’nun çevirisiyle YKY Yayınları tarafından yayımlandı. David Hockney benim çok sevdiğim bir kişilik. Öncelikle ressam olarak, ancak ilginç bir şekilde pentürdeki birikiminin yanı sıra fotoğraf üzerine azımsanamayacak bir eserler bütünü üretmiş olan sanatçıyla tanışmam bir fotoğraf serisi -fotomontaj serisi de diyebiliriz- aracılığıyla gerçekleşmişti. Fotoğraf teorisi üzerine yüksek lisans yaparken karşıma çıkan çalışma, ders kitaplarımızdan birinde fotoğrafın ikna edici “gerçeklik” iddiasının karşısında sıklıkla dikkatimizden kaçan bir yetersizliğine -fotoğraflarda gerçeği her zaman bir çerçeve içinde, dışarıda bıraktıklarının zararına görüyor olma durumumuza- dikkat çekme amacıyla örnek edilmişti. Hockney 80’li yıllarda yaptığı birleşik Polaroidler ve ardından 35mm fotoğraf baskılarıyla yaptığı birleşik oda görsellerine “joiners”, “birleşikler”adını vermişti. Odaların her köşesinin, tek bir açıdan defalarca fotoğraflanıp bir araya getirilmesi izleyicinin ayağının altında biten parkeler ve başının üzerine uzanan bir tavan yanılsaması, aynı zamanda belirgin bir Kübist etki de yaratıyordu. Bunların üzerine düşünmek, temsilin taraflılığı üzerine fazla bilgisi olmayan, “her resmin bir şeye bakma” olduğunu henüz içselleştirmemiş yirmi iki yaşındaki biri için oldukça etkileyici olmuştu.

Resmin Tarihi’nin, Mağaradan Bilgisayar Ekranınaalt başlığında da üzerine basılan temel dayanağı tam da bu: Mağara resimlerinden saray portrelerine, fotoğraflardan sinemaya her çeşit resim, iç içe fakat “birbirinden ayrılan tasvir türleri”dir. Söyleşi formatı, iki yazar tarafından sonradan belirlendiğini tahmin ettiğim on sekiz bölüm altında ayrıştırılmış. David Hockney ve Martin Gayford (daha önce bu kitabın bir nevi öndeyişi olan A Bigger Messageadlı kitapta da beraber çalışmışlardı) kitap boyunca fotoğrafın günümüzdeki kullanımlarına kanca atıyorlar. Karşı argüman [kritik içerik] var denemez, ancak söyleşi formatı mesela Caravaggio’nun tablolarının üretimiyle ilgili olan bölümde detektiflik yaptıklarına şahit olduğumuzda veya Hockney’in “bugün yaşasaydı Van Eyck’in stüdyosu bir MGM stüdyosuna benzerdi” gibi yorumlarıyla özellikle keyifli hale geliyor. 

Ancak konu Mantık Çağındabaşlıklı 12 bölümden itibaren gerçek hayatta, mucitler Camera Obscura’dan çıkan görselleri sabitlemeyi başardığında gelişenlere yaklaşık olarak derinleşiyor. Bu noktadan sonra kitabın iki yazarı görsel delillerin de yardımıyla fotoğrafın “temiz doğum” iddiasını, yani “öncesinin olmadığı ve kendiliğinden modern olduğu inancını” yok ediyorlar: “Fotoğrafın ruhu fotoğraftan çok daha eski.” Okur, bu noktaya varmak için çoktandır zemin hazırlamış olduklarını görebiliyor. Fotoğrafa referans verme eğilimini kitabın başından sonuna kadar, doğrudan adı konmadığı yerlerde bile alttan alta hissedebiliyoruz: Misal Titian’ın “İmparator V. Charles’ın grotesk çenesini bir asalet amblemine dönüştürmesinin” bahsi geçtiğinde. (Bu arada bence ekrandaki görsellerle ilintili olarak Charles V bir internet meme’i ve Hockney’in bazı havuz resimlerinin de öyle olması - hatta bir tanesi BoJack Horseman’da düzenli olarak arz-ı endam ediyordu- ilginçlik kazanıyor.)

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

Sonuç olarak, görsellerin evrimine dair tarihçelerin yetersiz olduğunu söyleyemeyeceğimiz için bu öznel serbest çağrışımcılık, kitabı özel yapan şeyin ta kendisi. Ancak iki yazarın çok kapsamlı tarih bilgisine rağmen buna gerçek anlamda bir tarihçe demek de zor. Bilakis verilen referanslar zaman içerisinde ileri geri atlayarak, üst üste konulmuş ciltleri kesen lazer ışınları misali tarihteki paralellikleri gösteriyorlar. Hockney’in kendi çalışmaları sıklıkla başyapıtların yanı sıra izleniyor. Varlığını burada egoist bir fazlalık değil de, günümüzde yaşayan bir ressamın resim üretme macerasında kendi deneyim ve pratiğini nasıl konumlandırdığını, hangi noktalarda sözü geçen ustalarla aynı çıkmazlarda kaldığını göstermek için bir aygıt olarak kabul etmek gerekiyor. Örneğin, “insan kendinden bilirmiş” sözünü çağrıştıran bir edayla “ressamlar her şeyi çalabilir ve renklendirebilir” diyor. Kendi adıma, fotoğrafı temel alarak çalışan bir görsel sanatçı olduğum için kendi işlerinde hep görsellerin bileşenlerini incelemeye odaklanmış olan bir ressamın ilham verici sürecine şahit olabilmek paha biçilemez bir şans. (Bkz. 57. sayfada Gonzales ve Gölgeadlı bayıldığım, hem fiziksel hem de metafiziksel olarak pek çok tabakaya sahip resim: Temelde başka bir sanatçının işi nasıl kendine mal edilir/zekat verilir sorusuna bir yanıt.)

Nitekim anlatı şöyle noktalarda zirve yapıyor: “Bir işareti ilginç kılan nedir? ...bir hareket. Çizgilerin içinde bir hız vardır, daha hızlı ya da daha yavaş fark etmez, bu hareketi görebilirsiniz...bu nedenle çizimlerde ekonomi çok değerli bir niteliktir. Bu bir erdem.” Veya, “Resimler unutulmaz olabilir, sıradanın dışında bir şey tasvir etmeseler bile. Bu resimde odada iki kişi var, pencereden dışarısı görünüyor, bir de kedi var. Bunlar, Mr ve Mrs Clark ve Percy’nin içeriği ve Eyck’in dört yıl elli yıldan önce resmettiği Arnolfini ve Karısının Portresi’nin de içerikleri.” (Resimleri unutulmaz yapan bileşenler üzerine bu koyu düşünüş Arnolfini Portresi’nin bir önceki bahsinde de öne çıkıyor.) Geçenlerde bir ressam arkadaşım küçük resimlerimle büyük resimlerimi karşılaştırırken küçüklerde “çok az kaygı bulunduğunu” söylemişti. Mesleğin dışındakilere anlamsız gelebilen, ancak ressamların ağzından nefes alırmışçasına rahatlık ve sıklıkla çıkan bu tür saptamalar beni hep çok şaşırtmıştır, bu kitapta da bol keseden varlar.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

A History of Pictures, David Hockney and Martin Gayford, Y.K.Y. Publishing. Photos: Zeynep Beler.

Eklemek gerekir ki, bu incelemeyi yazmak için olmasaydı muhtemelen bu çok hoş kitabı okumayacaktım. Okumak da gerektiği zaman bu kitap formatı biraz sinirime dokunuyor. ‘Kahve sehpası kitabı’ oldukça yerinde bir betimleme çünkü misal toplu taşımada böyle bir kitabı okumak hayli zor olur, ancak tabii kitaplarla oturmayı seven insanlar da var (bunu benim de öğrenmem gerektiğini rahatlıkla salık verebilirsiniz). Ayrıca, Thames & Hudson’dan çıkan orijinali aynı formatta ve çok sayıdaki yüksek çözünürlüklü eser fotoğrafını bu sayede en ideal şekilde görebildiğimiz de doğru. Türkçe versiyon dizilim olarak sayfasına kadar tıpatıp aynı ve dikkatle kürate edilmiş görseller arası iletişim bozulmamış. Çeviri ise diğer işleri bir yana çevirmen olarak üretkenliğine inanamadığım Mine Haydaroğlu tarafından özenle yapılmış.

“İnsanlar zaman zaman her şeyin bittiğini düşünüyorlar, oysa hiçbir zaman bitmiyor, sadece devam ediyor.” Ressam Paul Delaroche’nin daguerretip gördükten sonra rivayeten depresifçe iddia ettiği üzere fotoğrafın, pentürü öldürmenin tam aksine, ona hayat öpücüğü verdiğini ve ikisinin el ele geleceğe ilerlediklerini söylemek daha doğru olur. Dolayısıyla Resmin Tarihi’nin, özellikle de şu an içinde bulunduğumuz, görsel tarihçelerimizden resmin bazı alt-kategorilerine kadar her şeyin fotoğrafın despotizmine teslim olduğu noktada bize bunu hatırlatan bir işlevi olması şaşırtıcı değil. Kitap, bir sanatçı ve küratörün birlikte ve kendi kendilerine görsellerle uzun zaman harcadıktan sonra vardıkları çıkarımları bize sunarak bunu fazlasıyla başarıyor. Küratörün addettiği üzere fotoğrafın ebeveyni üzerine sorgulamaları ilgili ve merak dolu doğalarının da yardımıyla, dini ikonlar ve Çin kaligrafisinden tut Hollywood ışıklandırması ve selfie’lere kadar her şey arasında bir ilişkiler ağı örüyor.

http://www.ykykultur.com.tr/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1t9MEeh2UM